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Who should handle my Immigration application?

This article will talk about how to pick an immigration consultant, with factors you should keep in mind when you are selecting someone to work with.

  • One of the most important factors is their qualification. This includes education and experience, as well as certifications. When it comes to Canadian Immigration, make sure you are dealing with a licensed RCIC or Canadian lawyer. You should also check what licenses or certifications your candidate has to make sure that they are qualified to deal with whatever matter it is that has brought you in contact with them.
  • It’s important to make sure you select an immigration consultant who is not only qualified but, knowledgeable and available. The individual should be able to answer all your questions, about what can happen if your spouse or fiancée doesn’t receive the visa they are seeking. The immigration consultant should also be able to explain the process in simple terms that everyone can understand. They should also be willing to guide you through any issues that come up during your application, including answering all of the questions you might have about them that are specific to you.
  • Allowing your advisor to highlight what they have done in the past is also a good practice. Their track record, reviews and credibility in the market can be a good indicator.
  • When it comes to fees, you are looking for someone who is reasonable when it comes to what they charge for their services when compared against other options available in your area. The credibility of the consultant also plays a role in this case.
  • Immigration law and programs are constantly being updated, therefore it is important to engage a consultant who is on top of the latest happenings in the field.
  • Ghost consultants are individuals who take advantage of immigrants who may be unaware of the process. Often in dealing with ghost consultants, one often runs into the possibility of being fed incorrect information and false hopes, with primary intent to extract initial application fee (non-refundable), and keep the candidate indefinitely waiting for something they never qualified for in the first place.